This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Using Material From Item A And Elsewhere Asses The Functionalist View That Religion Benefits Both Society As A Whole And Its Individual Members (18 Marks)

898 words - 4 pages

Using material from item a and elsewhere asses the functionalist view that religion benefits both society as a whole and its individual members (18 marks)

Functionalists believe society is built up of different institutions that work together to make society work, religion is one of these institutions and helps society with its need for solidarity and social order. Like mentioned in Item A functionalists view religion as a positive thing and argue that it uses a shared set of norms and values to bring people together into a community. They say this gives everyone a sense of belonging which benefits both individuals and the community as a whole.
Durkheim said the thing we need to ...view middle of the document...

Another criticism of Durkheim is that his findings are based on small-scale religions and is harder to apply to most large-scale religions. Postmodernists also believe due to increasing levels of secularisation Durkheim’s views can’t be applied to today’s society.
Malinowski (1954) also believes religion provides solidarity but he develops that to say religion also provides emotional support for the individual members. He visited the Trobriand islanders and came to the conclusion that they used religion for support in two different situations. The first situation is any time there are major life events such a birth, death or marriage. The second situation is when the outcome is important but is uncontrollable. He watched the differences when they fished in the lagoon to when they fished in the ocean. When the tribe went fishing in the lagoon there was no ritual carried out. But when they went fishing in the ocean due to the dangers it held they performed a ritual first as they needed the emotional support it gave them.
Parsons (1967) also thought religion provided emotional support for unforeseen events. Parsons also said religion creates central values by making norms and values sacred, this helps ensure a value consensus and social stability. He says another feature of religion is to provide a source of meaning, he states it gives people an answer for unanswerable questions. It uses heaven as a reward for daily suffering people may experience. This allows people to believe life has a deeper meaning and maintains stability in society.
However Marxists such as Marx and Engles believe religion doesn’t benefit all of society and that it...

Other Papers Like Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere Asses the Functionalist View That Religion Benefits Both Society as a Whole and Its Individual Members (18 Marks)

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Asses the View That Crime and Deviance Are the Product of Labelling Processes

1646 words - 7 pages occurs as a result of labelling that has been placed on an individual for partaking in a certain activity that has previously been labelled as opposing the norms and values that are upheld in society by those who “conform”which as a result leads to a self fulfilling prophecy being fulfilled. Labelling theorist therefore reject other explanations for crime such as the Marxist approach that argue it is due to the subordinate position of the

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess the Usefulness of Functionalist Approach in Explaning Crime

1306 words - 6 pages Using material from Item A and elsewhere, assess the usefulness of functionalist approaches in explaining crime (21 marks) Deviance is defined as the state of diverging from usual or accepted standards whereas crime is defined as an action or omission which constitutes an offence and is punishable by law. Usually, we would expect that functionalists would regard crime and deviance as wholly negative. However, functionalists such as Durkheim see

Using the Information from Items a, B and C and Elsewhere, Assess the View That the Nuclear Family Functions to Benefit All Its Members and Society as a Whole

1276 words - 6 pages believe less in the nuclear family on the basis that they disagree with the role of the woman within the nuclear family. They believe that the family does not benefit society, but that it benefits men. Therefore having assessed the view that the nuclear family functions to benefit all its members and society as a whole, we can see in general, it does benefit society, however, there are different opinions whether it benefits all the members within the family (in the feminist’s case). However if the family unit benefits society, this benefits all the individuals who live within it. So this view can also be contradicted.

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess the Contribution of Religion to Social Change

934 words - 4 pages Using material from Item A and elsewhere, assess the contribution of religion to social change. (18 marks) Weber found that religion could cause social change, such as the Calvinism and capitalism. The Calvinists believed in predestination, so God had already chosen the elect to go to heaven and the individuals who hadn’t, could not do anything to change that. They believed that God was far

Using Material From Item C And Elsewhere, Assess The Strengths And Limitations Of Using Qualitative Documents As A Means Of Investigating Suicide. (15 Marks)

511 words - 3 pages . However such great details does come with its limitations as so much information means that the sociologists has to look though so much. Not only this but you are going to need plenty of personal documents from lots of different people to be able to spot a pattern. Durkheim noticed that there were 4 different reasons as to why people commit suicide. These included egoistic, altruistic, anomic and fatalistic. Although Durkheim’s research was useful

Using Material from Item C and Elsewhere, Assess the Strengths and Limitations of Using Structured Interviews as a Means of Investigating Substance Abuse Among Homeless People. (15 Marks)

741 words - 3 pages , they are mistrustful of the police or any other organisation representing authority. Many of the homeless are people who have ‘fallen through the net’, in that they have suffered from poor education, long-term unemployment and/or mental illness. Some homeless substance abusers may feel excluded from society and may welcome the chance to talk about their situation. Item C portrays homelessness to be a deviant lifestyle which therefore suggests

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess Sociological Explanations of Changes in the Status of Childhood (24 Marks)

1247 words - 5 pages ‘Assess’ Essay Planning Sheet Name: Essay Title: Using material from Item A and elsewhere, assess sociological explanations of changes in the status of childhood (24 marks) | Underline or highlight the key concepts, terms and instructions, by identifying these key elements it will allow you to focus on answering the question. It is important to use relevant sociological terminology

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess the Usefulness of Subcultural Theories in Explaining `Subcultural Crime and Deviance' in Society Today. (21 Marks)

782 words - 4 pages To define subculture, it’s where a number of individuals choose to be a part of a separate group that follow distinct norms and values different to those in mainstream society as stated in item A. Subcultures may contain norms and values that would be considered deviant in society and involve criminal activity. In Stanley Cohen’s view the subcultural crime and deviance today results from the inability of lower classes to achieve mainstream

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess the View That Crime and Deviance Are the Product of Using Labelling Processes

846 words - 4 pages Ella Duala Topic 2 Essay Sociology 24/09/2014 Using material from item A and elsewhere, assess the view that crime and deviance are the product of using labelling processes (21 marks) Some sociologists believe that the initial cause of crime and deviance is attaching a definition or meaning to an individual or group of individuals, due to their ethnicity, social background, or gender. Many sociologists argue that no act is criminal in

Using Material from Item a and Elsewhere, Assess the View That the Growth of Religious Fundamentalism Is a Reaction to Globalisation

1030 words - 5 pages Using material from item A and elsewhere, assess the view that the growth of religious fundamentalism is a reaction to globalisation As mentioned in item A ‘much has been written about the decline of religious beliefs and the secularisation of modern societies’ this states that the growth of fundamentalism represents a culture which tends to be a clash between the sacred an secular. Fundamentalism refers to ‘black and white’ thinking that

Using material from Item A and elsewhere, assess the view that the growth of religious fundamentalism is a reaction to globalisation

583 words - 3 pages communism, conflicts between different civilisations have worsened between each other, and argues that political differences have since become less of a problem between nations, and people use religion as a source of their identity. This creates a position of ‘us and them’, meaning the “west vs the rest” and this creates fear due to and how religion influences behaviours of the nation and individual movements. He argued that political

Related Essays

Functionalist View That Religion Benefits Society As A Whole And Its Individual Members

1052 words - 5 pages Asses the functionalist view that religion benefits society as a whole and its individual members Emile Durkheim defines religion in terms of the contribution it makes to social integration, rather than any specific belief in God or the supernatural. Through this essay I will be analysing Durkheim’s views, as well as other functionalists’ views about society and to what extent religion does benefit society. To functionalists religion is

Using Material From Item A And Elsewhere Assess The Postmodernist View That The Nature Of Religion In Society Today Is Becoming A Matter Of Consumer Choice. (18 Marks)

784 words - 4 pages Postmodernists argue that in recent years, western societies have undergone major economic and cultural changes. We have changed from a modern to a postmodern society, and this has had a big impact on the religious beliefs that we hold. For example, in a traditional society, a person is born into a religion, they will learn about that religion from a young age and it will shape their personality and lives. However, in modern society, people have

Using Material From Item A And Elsewhere, Assess The View That Science Is The Dominant Metanarrative In Society Today. (18 Marks)

1021 words - 5 pages , metanarratives such as religion may seem less influential in society today as it’s seen as a closed belief system. Robin Horton says that religion makes knowledge claims that cannot be successfully overturned. Whenever its fundamental beliefs are threatened, a closed belief system has several ‘get out clauses’ that reinforce the system and prevent it from being disproved. One good example of this is witchcraft beliefs. Evans Prichard's 1936 classic study

Using Material From Item A And Elsewhere Assess The Contribution Of Religion To Social Change (18 Marks)

1030 words - 5 pages Using material from Item A and elsewhere assess the contribution of religion to social change (18 marks) Religion can be powerful under the right certain circumstances for social change. However it can be argued that religion can be a conservative force. Weber argues that religious beliefs contributed to major social change- specifically the emergence of modern capitalism in Northern Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries. Modern capitalism