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To Kill A Mockingbird Vs. Of Mice And Men

1247 words - 5 pages

Verina Gobran




What life lessons can the reader take away from the study of To Kill a Mockingbird and Of Mice and Men



English Language Arts PGL 20F
Mrs. Zacharuk
January 14th, 2014


Life is not perfect; sometime we succeed and sometime we fail. But, the good thing is we can learn from our mistakes. To Kill a Mockingbird and of Mice and Men show us many useful life lessons. These lessons can teach us how to be a considerable person and live a better life with others. The main three lessons are courage, seeing things from others’ perspective and showing compassion.

In both novels, there is a lot of courage that the readers see either in decisions ...view middle of the document...

He went against Maycomb, a generally prejudice town, in order to defend Tom. He understood that taking the case would make him an object of ridicule, and that no one would forgive him for believing in a black man's word rather than a white man's. Even his own sister expresses disapproval of his decision by saying “now he's turned out a nigger-lover we'll never be able to walk the streets of Maycomb again. He's ruinin' the family, that's what he's doin'." (9.96-98) but, no matter how much his reputation suffered, he did not change his mind. Standing up for his morals and ethics was more important than what people thought about him. Atticus knows he will not win the case and like Mrs. Dubose in her battle against morphine, he is "licked" before he begins. Atticus's strong sense of morality and justice motivates him to defend Tom Robinson with determination, and giving it all he has got. He shows this when he says, "Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try and won." He wants the people of Maycomb to hear the truth about Tom, "That boy may go to the chair, but he's not going till the truth's told." (Chapter 15, Page 146) and he put Tom's well-being after his own welfare. The courage that these characters showed; turned their lives upside down but they felt good knowing that they did what was right.

Standing in a person’s shoes is one of the most important themes and life lessons in both novels. Atticus explains to Scout in the novel, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb in his skin and walk around in it.” (Chapter 3, pg.30) An interesting example of standing in someone’s shoes is when Boo stands in Scout’s shoes. His care and concern for her (and Jem) is evident throughout the novel, such as in chapter 8 when Boo (Arthur) puts a blanket around Scout, “Boo Radley. You were so busy looking at the fire you didn’t know it when he put the blanket around you” This shows that Boo looks after the children, and this could be interpreted as standing in Scout’s shoes as the reader can see that he is thinking what it must be like from her point of view, and then doing what he can to help her, which people who talk to her and live with her don’t...

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