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The Joy Luck Club Essay

1328 words - 6 pages

Social PsychologyJoy Luck Club;The Joy Luck Club explores the different mother-daughter relationships between the characters, and at a lower level, relationships between friends, lovers, and even enemies. This movie presents the conflicting views and the stories of both sides, providing the viewer--and ultimately, the characters--with an understanding of the mentalities of both mother and daughter, and why each one is the way she is. The two main themes of the story I will be discussing are the challenges of cultural translation and how story telling can help and influence communication and self assertion.The Challenges of Cultural Translation - Throughout The Joy Luck Club, the various ...view middle of the document...

Storytelling as a Means of Self-Assertion and Communication - Because the barriers between the Chinese and the American cultures are conflicting by imperfect translation of language, the mothers use storytelling to circumvent these barriers and communicate with their daughters. The stories they tell are often educational, warning against certain mistakes or giving advice based on past successes. For instance, Ying-ying's decision to tell Lena about her past is motivated by her desire to warn Lena against the passivity and fatalism that Ying-ying suffered. Storytelling is also employed to communicate messages of love and pride, and to illumine one's inner self for others.Another use of storytelling concerns historical legacy. By telling their daughters about their family histories, the mothers ensure that their lives are remembered and understood by subsequent generations, so that the characters who acted in the story never die away completely. In telling their stories to their daughters, the mothers try to instill them with respect for their Chinese ancestors and their Chinese pasts. Suyuan hopes that by finding her long lost daughters and telling them her story, she can assure them of her love, despite her apparent abandonment of them. When Jing-mei sets out to tell her half-sisters Suyuan's story, she also has this goal in mind, as well as her own goal of letting the twins know who their mother was and what she was like.Storytelling is also used as a way of controlling one's own fate. In many ways, the original purpose of the Joy Luck Club was to create a place to exchange stories. Faced with pain and hardship, Suyuan decided to take control of the plot of her life. The Joy Luck Club did not simply serve as a distraction; it also enabled transformation--of community, of love and support, of circumstance. Stories work to encourage a certain sense of independence. They are a way of forging one's own identity and gaining autonomy. Waverly understands this: while Lindo believes that her daughter's crooked nose means that she is ill-fated, Waverly dismisses this passive interpretation and changes her identity and her fate by reinventing the story that is told about a crooked nose.At some point in the movie, each of the major characters expresses anxiety over her inability to reconcile her Chinese heritage with her American surroundings. Indeed, this reconciliation is the very aim of Jing-mei's journey to China. While the daughters in the movie are genetically Chinese (except for Lena who is half Chinese) and have been raised in mostly Chinese households, they also identify with and feel at home in modern American culture. Waverly, Rose, and Lena all have white boyfriends or husbands, and they...

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