Rudyard Kipling Essay

1424 words - 6 pages

The Legendary Life of Rudyard Kipling
Rudyard Kipling was one of the greatest writers of all time. He was a gifted writer and a huge celebrity, and has provided us with countless writings that will continue to be enjoyed by future generations. There are two perspectives when it comes to Kipling’s canonization; those that believe based solely on his writing abilities think he should be canonized, and those who saw him as an only an outspoken political figure do not. The questions surrounding his use of a swastika show him to be a possible Nazi sympathizer and curve his support of canonization. The purpose of this research paper is to provide the insight and the facts to support the stature ...view middle of the document...

Once she discovered he was sneaking away to read, she scolded him and confiscated all of the books his parents had sent him. He then began to imagine his own characters and stories while bouncing a ball against the wall so she would think he was simply playing.
After spending 5 years at the boarding home, his mother received news that he was becoming mentally ill and returned for him so he could attend the United Services College, where he became the editor of the school paper. (Merriman) Kipling's closest friend at Westward Ho!, George Beresford, described him as a short, but "cheery, capering, podgy, little fellow" with a thick pair of spectacles over "a broad smile." His eyes were brilliant blue, and over them his heavy black eyebrows moved up and down as he talked. (Advameg) His parents eventually sent him back to India where his father got him a job as a journalist. He began frequenting opium dens and brothels, which flooded his mind with material to write his earliest works. He began writing about drug addicts and sex. He essentially had began his career as a roving reporter, traveling to various parts of India and the United States. He wrote dozens of essays and short stories, the most notable of them being Barrack-Room Ballads, which made his writings quite popular with servicemen at the time. (Merriman)
In 1889 Kipling took a long voyage through China, Japan, and the United States. When he reached London, he found that his stories had preceded him and established him as a brilliant new author. He was readily accepted into the circle of leading writers. (Advameg) After moving back to England, he began writing about a new subject, the British soldier. He soon moved to the United States and married Caroline Balestier, the sister of his publisher. They settled on the Balestier estate near Brattleboro, Vermont, in the United States, and began four of the happiest years of Kipling's life. During this time he wrote some of his best work. (Advameg) They soon had his first child, Josephine, who inspired him to write some of his most renowned children’s literature. The Jungle Book and “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” were by far his most popular works and are still read by children today. The Jungle Book, published in 1892, was eventually made into a movie in 1942, and animated by Disney in the 1960’s (Liukkonen). It is still quite a popular story among children today. The fascination of talking animals and a lost boy’s adventures still exists today. By the time he was 32, he was the highest paid novelist in the world. Some people relate Kipling with the swastika. Kipling occasionally used the defamed symbol on the bindings and covers of his books. These people view this as Kipling being a Nazi sympathizer. This does not seem to be the case. The pre-Nazi Swastika was a Hindu symbol of good luck, which he learned through his father’s knowledge of Indian art, but the suspicion still remains to this day. (Walker)
While in the United States, Josephine and...

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