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Poem Analysis On "The Tyger" By William Blake

536 words - 3 pages

In the first stanza we can observe that the word "tiger" is written with a "y" instead of an "I", this is to give the word an inclination towards Ancient Greece. This is closely followed by the alliteration "(…) burning bright (…)" .This alliteration is used by the author to emphasize the strong, bright, shiny colors of the "tyger". The "symmetry" y highlighted in this stanza, this is closely related to the spelling of the word because in Ancient Greece symmetry is seen as ´beauty´. It also speaks about an "immortal hand or eye", which makes an allusion to the creator of this tiger, ...view middle of the document...

In the third stanza, the god creator of the tiger is seen as an artist, as the author writes "And what shoulder, & what art". This shows the appreciation he has for the creator's work. This is followed by the phrase "and when thy heart began to beat", this highlights a symbol of the god's power to create life, and it represent a symbol of life.In stanza number four, the god is presented as a "Hammersmith"; we can see this by the use of the words "hammer", "furnace", "anvil". There is also an alliteration that says "dare its deadly..." this remarks how mortal are the tiger's claws.In stanza number five, there is a reference to shooting stars which says "when the stars threw down their spears". With this stanza the writer asks many rhetorical questions like, if the god smiled when he saw his creation? if he is the same god that made Christ?. These questions are asked with the meaning of making the reader ask himself about the nature of this god. Is this god pure good?The sixth stanza, repeats the first one. This installs in the poem the shape of a circle. The author did this because a circle is a typical symbol of eternity. This highlights the everlasting life of the "tyger" and of its creator. This poem makes us think about how powerful, beautiful, good but at the same time evil, is the god that made this work of art.

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