Norse Mythology Essay

1685 words - 7 pages

The Norse culture believed in and honored many different supernatural beings or gods or goddesses on a daily basis. For example, when help was needed for a husband and a wife to conceive or birth a child, or to work out problems that they were having in their marriage or to make the land and the sea produce more food, they would call upon the Goddess Freya. She was the Goddess of Abundance and Fertility. If there was a drought or a flood, they would call upon Thor, the God of Thunder and one of the most powerful gods, to either bring the rain or stop the rain in order to help the food grow because he was known as the one who held the thunder and lightning. If a man from the Norse culture ...view middle of the document...

It was initiated by the male suitor and approved by the woman’s father. In many cases, marriages were arranged to build an alliance between families. The marriage was the means by which the families’ wealth was distributed amongst the next generation. The groom’s father promised to pay a sum called mundr (bride price) to obtain the woman. The bride’s father declared his right to give his daughter away and promised to pay a heimangero (dowry) at the wedding.
The two parties shook hands in front of witnesses to fix the bargain, and arranged a date, usually within a year. Thus, the betrothal differed little from any other commercial transaction: there was an agreed upon price, a handshake, and witnesses.” A boy was an adult after the age of fifteen and a girl who was twelve years old was thought to be old enough to marry.
The Norse were very hard working people and most of their food came from growing it on their own farms. Their meat came from birds, horses, pigs, cattle, goats and sheep. They ate a lot of bread made from oats, barley and rye. Their dairy came from their goats, cows and sheep, as did their butter and cheese. They grew a large variety of vegetables, which included onions, peas, cabbage and beans and they ate a lot of fruit, which included berries, apples, cherries and pears. They used wild honey to make their foods sweet. If they lived near a river or a lake, then they ate a lot of fish. The men were the hunters and would often bring home rabbits, deer, elk, bears and boar. The women were very skilled in preserving the food by smoking it or by drying it out. The women did the majority of the cooking, mostly by boiling everything in a cauldron that was hung over a fire pit by an iron chain, but sometimes, they would roast the meats on a spit. Most Norse families ate at least two meals a day and most were able to sit at a table. If the family was very wealthy, they would have a tablecloth on their table.
In death, social structure determined what you would be buried with and how you would be buried. If a person was wealthy, they were buried in a large grave with all of their possessions that they would have used in their day to day life. They would have even been buried with their horse and slaves. If a person was poor, they were buried in a simple grave with just a few of the possessions that they would have used on a day to day basis.

William R. Short. 1996. 10 April 2010.
The story of Thor’s Stolen Hammer is about how Thor’s, the God of Thunder, magic hammer, which was also known as Mjollnir, was stolen from his belt. In the beginning of the story, Thor thought that his friend Loki, who was always playing tricks on everyone, had taken his hammer but when Thor asked Loki if he did take it, Loki told him that he had not taken it. This made Thor even madder because now he knew that it had definitely been stolen. Thor then asked Loki if he would help him find it and of course, after seeing how...

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