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Mark Twain's The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn The Problem With Huck Finn

528 words - 3 pages

The Problem with Huck Finn

                             

      A person is a product of his or her society and environment. A person grows up learning skills and traits from the people around him. These traits influence and affect the person unconsciously for the rest of his life. For instance if a person grows up with an abusive father chances are he will grow up to be abusive to people around him. But what we learn may not necessarily be right (like what is mentioned above), but the person doesn't know that. What would ...view middle of the document...

As he becomes more and more of a friend to a runaway slave and helps him in escape his entire moral standards are challenged. But this leaves him with an invaluable lesson.

 

      Huck meets Jim as they both are running away from their lives, for different reasons. Huck and Jim head down the Mississippi. But Jim is a runaway slave and Huck is faced with a decision to help or turn Jim in. Huck comes very close to turning Jim in as he struggles to determine what is correct and what is not correct. Huck throughout the story struggles within him to find out for himself what is right and wrong. He sees Jim's compassionate nature and Good-Will and realizes the institution that is slavery is not moral and is in fact the opposite.

 

Huck even in one triumphant moment comes over his doubts about the morality of slavery. Huck stats "Alright then I'll go to hell". Huck in this one simple statement defines his opinion. No matter what the consequence of his actions, if it be Hell, or jail or whatever, he will not betray Jim. Huck in his struggle inside of himself comes to realize the right thing to do and in doing so becomes a man. A man able to think for himself, and make his own conscience decisions.

 

      One is brought up in a certain environment. Ones personality is shaped and molded off of his environment. But one doesn't have to follow the Norms and standards of ones societies. In Fact it takes more courage and strength to be an individual and to be a free-thinking person. Huck become this and Huck became a Man when he stopped and thought about the institution of Slavery.

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