Liberalism Debate Essay

846 words - 4 pages

Vincent Serrecchia
Professor Cruz
Latino Politics
28 February 2012

Debate Paper #2

According to Webster’s dictionary, the definition of liberalism is as follows, “a political philosophy based on belief in progress, the essential goodness of the human race, and the autonomy of the individual and standing for the protection of political and civil liberties.” The first known use of liberalism in our society was in 1819, and from then on it has always claimed to stand for the greatest social good. As for liberalism being incompatible with identity politics, I disagree. I believe identity politics is compatible with liberalism. Liberalism is considered democracy free while identity ...view middle of the document...

Identity politics deals with political arguments that focus on self-interests and perspectives of self-identified groups of people. Liberalism has to do with the belief of liberty and equal rights. I think these two types of politics co-inside because, to me, self-interests mean the same thing as equality.
I think its better to focus on self-interests because that can promote equality. Also, identity politics are the perspectives of different social interest groups and, in this way; the aspects of their identity can shape their politics. Because identity politics are shaped by different groups of people, it includes multiple perspectives of the way the public wants their government to be run which makes everything equal. Identity politics forces different groups of people to work together to form a common goal of equality. This is why identity politics and liberalism can be compatible because they both deal with the equality of mankind.
Identity politics and liberalism have the same goals. They both want to achieve equality with rights. Although identity politics goes about gaining equality in a different way, in the end they still attain the same thing. Even though many individuals in class agreed with the debate question, I, along with the other half of the individuals participating in the debate disagreed.
During the debate, it seemed that the amount of people that agreed or disagreed with the debate question were about even. The people that agreed with the question had a very different opinion. They thought that liberalism and identity politics were...

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