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Jazz In The 19th Century Essay

683 words - 3 pages

Jazz in the 19th Century

As the United States entered the 1920's it was not as unified as one might think. Not one, but two societies existed. The Black society, whose ancestors had been oppressed throughout the ages, and the White society, the oppressors of these men and women. After emancipation the Whites no longer needed the Blacks, but were forced to live with them. The Blacks despised the Whites, but even so they became more like them in every way. Even though these two races had grown so similar over the past century and a half, they were still greatly diversified. One aspect of this great diversity was the difference in music trends. The White society was still in love ...view middle of the document...

The reason for this was because jazz and blues could be played by anyone from the whitest white to the blackest black. By this time White Americans could be heard playing the "true" jazz and blues. The true jazz was music played by the black man, because it was his music. Even white jazz players were beginning to be famous. Artists such as Paul White man and O.D.J.B. were whites who began to play jazz. Music played by these people was really the first jazz that northerners were exposed to, and because of this black northerners began to think of jazz as a white dilution of blues. Jazz music used the same instruments as ragtime did except for the piano. The piano was not brought into the picture until later. In 1921 the first Black jazz band broke onto the national scene. This band contained many of the greats such as Joe Oliver and Louis Armstrong. They offered a smoother type of jazz compared to the sloppy jazz of the early White groups.



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