This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Henry Viii Foreign Policy Essay

901 words - 4 pages

How far do Source 1 and Source 2 suggest that the young Henry VIII saw the nobility as his friends and supporters?
Sources 1 and 2 have very different ideas of whether Henry VIII saw the nobility as his friends and supporters, as initially both sources seem very contradictive of each other. Source 1 is very based around the idea of a Henry seeing a friendship between him and the nobility whereas Source 2 suggests that Henry and the nobility had a very conflicting relationship which was not friendly in any aspect. However there are further aspects in the Sources which both agree with one another in the portrayal that they Henry did see the nobility as his friends and supporters.
Source 1 ...view middle of the document...

Source 1 further agrees that the Henry saw the nobility as his friends and supporters as they are shown as companions at dinner, taking part in entertainment, and it quotes “they all laughed and danced” and “joked with all” these statements from source 1 indicate that the King did see the nobility in fact as his friends and supporters as laughing and dancing would suggest a relaxed, easy-going atmosphere with people you would feel comfortable with and this would highlight a friendship as there is clearly no tension or no hierarchy noted. Source 1 however may be fairly biased and unreliable in the way that their relationship is illustrated as friendly because the source was a description from Henry’s point of view and the festivities were controlled and organised by the King so his judgement of the situation and his pleasure may have altered the truth, especially as Henry would’ve wanted people to believe he was powerful, which having a strong friendship and lots of support from the nobility would provide.
In Source 1 the King arranged for light-hearted entertainment where he had the nobility “parade in strange costumes” this suggests that the King’s relationship with the nobility wasn’t primarily professional as the messing around suggests he saw them as in fact friends. This suggestions contradicts what is said in source 2 where Henry is seen issuing orders against retaining and threatening those that do not comply with his instructions, it states “the king commands to cease forthwith… or bear the King’s anger and...

Other Papers Like Henry Viii Foreign Policy

How Far Do You Agree That the Most Important Reason for Wolsey’s Fall from Power Was His Failure to Gain a Divorce for Henry Viii?

957 words - 4 pages The most important reason for Wolsey’s fall from power was his failure to gain a divorce for Henry VIII, how far do you agree? Wolsey’s dismissal from Henry’s court came in September 1529, though Wolsey had a plethora of failures before, his fall his failure to get a divorce for Henry VIII proved to be the most significant. This is because Wolsey’s strength of position depended on whether he got Henry what he wanted and the divorce was the

Do You Agree with the View That in the Years 1515-1525 Henry Viii Wholly Surrendered Power in Government to Cardinal Wolsey?

929 words - 4 pages Do you agree with the view that in the years 1515-1525 Henry VIII wholly surrendered power in government to Cardinal Wolsey? To a certain extent within 
Source 4 (by J.J. Scarisbrick 1968) supports the idea that possibly Henry VIII actually did surrender power over to Wolsey. The evidence within the source that suggests this possibly for being the truth is ‘a self-indulgent King had wholly surrendered the cares of the state into the Cardinals

The Fall of Somerset Was Principally Due to the 1549 Rebellions.Docx Uploaded Successfully

1409 words - 6 pages “The fall of Somerset was principally due to the 1549 rebellions.” Assess the validity of this view. During the final years of Henry VIII life he claimed that effective government should be carried out by council of 16 members. However, the last period of Henry VIII reign the reform faction were dominating and Edward Seymour managed to overthrow the regency council to become the ‘Protector’. Initially the rise of Somerset was a planned coup

The Italian Wars

1776 words - 8 pages , invaded Italy for other reasons than those of France. Spain clearly became involved in the wars because of the foreign policy interests of Ferdinand of Aragon (who ruled Spain along with Isabella). At this time, it was not know as Spain, but it was two separate states known as Castille and Aragon. They both had their own interests. Aragon was more interested in the Kingdom of Naples because it was ruled by Ferdinand’s cousin and there had been a

Princes in Tower

582 words - 3 pages leading male of the house of York. However the mysterious disappearance of the two princes had a lasting impact on Richard III’s reign and as century’s have passed it has been presumed he had his two nephews murdered. In the long run this led to Henry Tudor gaining support from nobles and foreign powers. This ultimately lead to York dynasty ending prematurely, even though Henry actually had to defend his throne against Yorkist malcontents at Stoke

Henry VIII And His Contribution To The English Reformation

1628 words - 7 pages Henry VIII, the notorious King of England, had an exceptionally significant influence on English history. The importance of Henry's eminent reign is typically overshadowed by his six wives, but to discover its true essence one must breach the barriers yielded by the many fallacies concerning his overly publicized liaisons. Although to many he is remembered solely for his hedonistic life style, his malicious attitudes, and of course his six wives

To What Extent Did Royal Authority Decline in the Years in the Years 1547-1558

1714 words - 7 pages combination of weak rulers, number of financial and economic problems, a series of rebellions, religious reformations, foreign policy failures and the fact that Edward to be too young for rule and Mary was a woman. Henry VI had survived as king as a minor; a council of competing nobles ruled on his behalf from the time he succeeded to the throne, aged eight months, in 1422. Therefore Edwards young age was not really an issue, also Castile of Spain

Foreign Management

1031 words - 5 pages China’s Foreign Exchange Management I. The history of China’s foreign exchange management system For a long time China has been implementing relatively strict foreign exchange administration system due to shortage of foreign exchange resources, insufficiency of macro control capability, imperfection of market system. Since China took on the innovative opening-up policy in 1978, China forms a foreign exchange administration profile--“RMB

Norther Ireland Troubles

1427 words - 6 pages European influence. In the subsequent centuries, Irish and English cultures were deeply intertwined, under the canopy of the Catholic Church. During these times, it is safe to say that the Irish identity experienced a strong redefinition. Even following the fall of the Roman Empire, the Catholic faith remained a strong thread in the fabric of Irish identity. Henry VIII and his Reformation created religious chaos across the realm, with a larger

Henry Kissinger

1805 words - 8 pages in American history and foreign policy. References Chambers II, J.W. (2000). “Paris Peace Agreement”. The Oxford Companion to American Military History. Retrieved November 15, 2011 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O126-ParisPeaceAgreement.html Hanhimako, J. (2004). The flawed architect: Henry Kissinger and American foreign policy. New York: Oxford University

Assess the Significance of Religion as a Factor in Bringing About Change in the Nature of Royal Authority Between 1540 – 1642

2189 words - 9 pages overthrow Lady Jane Gray the queen at the time and it was Edward wish to have Lady Jane as his successor. But on the other hand it could be argued that it showed powerful Tudor authority as Mary was a true Tudor and had right to the throne as it was left in Henry VIII will if Edward should died, Mary would be his Successor. But overall, one factor that is clear from the Lady Jane succession is that it did suggest that England wanted catholism at

Related Essays

Henry Viii Foriegn Policy Essay

1192 words - 5 pages Henry VIII’s foreign policy primarily involved France and the Habsburg Empire. Traditionally, Tudor foreign policy tried to steer a path of neutrality with both these states and initially Henry VIII’s foreign policy was no different. Henry knew that England did not have the ability to take on either state but that as a nation she could profit from extending the hand of friendship to both. This plan fell apart when it became plain that Henry

How Successful Was Wolsey’s Foreign Policy In The Years 1515 1525?

780 words - 4 pages How Successful was Wolsey’s Foreign Policy in the Years 1515-1525? (30 marks) Wolsey became Henry VIII’s Lord Chancellor in 1515, he was extremely able and determined; his foreign policy was mainly directed at preserving peace and trying to make England a negotiator between other countries. During the years 1515-1525 Wolsey’s power was undisputed, this was due to the fact that Henry VIII delegated more and more state business to Wolsey

Henry Viii (1491 1547), King Of England

2295 words - 10 pages and the Wales Under Henry VIII, Whales was most reorganized , thanks to the efforts of Thomas Cronwell. After the execution of Rhys ap Gruffydd, dominant figure in Wales affairs,new policy was necessary for Wales, where law and order had ceased to exist. It was also a necassery to secure Welsh support fort the revolution in church and state which had beeen carried out in Reformation Parliament. There was done an Act and the Act brought the

Who Within England Supported The Reformation And Why?

3417 words - 14 pages . Lotherington, John, (ed.), The Tudor Years. UK, 1998. MacCulloch, Diarmaid, (ed.), The Reign of Henry VIII: Politics, Policy and Piety. London, 1995. Newcombe, D.G., Henry VIII and the English Reformation. London, 1995. O’Day, Rosemary, The Longman Companion to The Tudor Age. London, 1995. Randell, Keith, Henry VIII and the Reformation in England. UK, 1993. Rex, Richard, Henry VIII and the English Reformation. London