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Examine Sociological Views Of The Ways In Which Educational Policies May Affect The Achievement Of Pupils

860 words - 4 pages

January 2003 –
Examine sociological views of the ways in which educational policies may affect the achievement of pupils.
There are many Educational Acts enforced in England to help improve and stabilise the education of young people in our country. With these acts in place it encourages more people to want to do well in school and it also helps to provide an education for those who are less fortunate and without it could not go to school. Some of the acts are: “The 1870 Forster Act”, “1944 Butlers Act”, “1976 Comprehensive Act”, “The 1979 Conservative Policy”, “The 1988 Education Act” and “The 1997 New Labour Education Policy”
Before the 19th century education was limited to those that ...view middle of the document...

They proposed to open three types of schools in the country, they were: Grammar Schools, Technical Schools and Secondary Modern Schools. They brought in a test called 11+ Exam; this meant that when you were 11 you would take an exam that would determine what school you would go to. If you passed the exam you would go to a grammar school where you would study academic subjects, only the top 15-20% of children would go here and was considered to be a great achievement if you made it in. On the other hand it was considered quite saddening if you didn’t pass it because you then thought that you was stupid, having a serious effect on your self-esteem. The Technical School was for the students that didn’t quite pass the 11+ but didn’t get far off passing, this was only for 5% of pupils. Here students would study more vocational courses and technical skills so that they could aspire to more manual work than the grammar pupils. The secondary modern schools were basically for the rest of the pupils who weren’t clever enough to pass the 11+ at all. This was 60-75% of the population. They would still receive a basic education there were just no external exams.
Comprehensivisation was introduced in the late 60’s after the weaknesses were revealed in the tripartite system; they believed that the talent of many children in the secondary modern schools was just being wasted. Comprehensive school is a state school that does not select its intake on the basis of academic achievement. This means that every student get the same opportunity to do well and...

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