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Comparing The Wife's Role In A Doll's House And Death Of A Salesman

978 words - 4 pages

The Wife's Role in A Doll's House and Death of a Salesman

 
      "A Doll's House" (1879) and "Death of a Salesman" (1949) are plays written by Henric Ibsen and Henry Miller respectively. And, although they were published in different centuries, and "A Doll's House" was written seventy years before than "Death of a Salesman" Nora's portrayal of the wife's role is much more modern, liberal and less chauvinist than Linda's. Nora and Linda's main differences are reflected in their way of acting towards their husbands, their children and them selves; how they each see life.

 

To her husband, Linda is the perfect wife, she loves him despite knowing he is only "a small man." ...view middle of the document...

She is also different from Linda because at the end she sees all her husbands' mistakes. She becomes aware that Torvarld is a coward that instead of supporting her, runs away and doesn't want to have anything to do with her in the bad moments. He just supports her in the good ones as we can see when she declares, "When your first panic was over - not about what threatened me, but about what might happen to you - and when there was no more danger, then, as far as you were concerned, it was just as if nothing had happened at all. I was simply your little songbird, your doll, and from now on you would handle it more gently than ever because it was so delicate and fragile." Nora realises that "for eight years [she's] been living with a strange man", and she feels she has no personality because she has always been acting like a puppet for Torvarld and has done always what he wanted. Finally, she confronts Torvarld and leaves him to live her own life.

 

Towards their sons Linda is more caring than Nora. She is the perfect mother, she has educated them since they were born, and has tried to install in them good values. Even though she does not like confrontations she becomes a strong woman when she reprimands them about being selfish, impolite, rude and disrespectful towards their father. Nora is more careless about her sons; she just plays with them as Torvarld does with her. Nora's sons are just like dolls for her, she does not worry about them and has never taught them anything, nor values or feelings, just games. When the play ends, Nora runs away from her house to live a new life and abandons her children knowing that...

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