Characteristics Of Gothic Horror Essay

544 words - 3 pages

Characteristics of a Gothic Horror

Whenever someone thinks of something that is gothic, the common thing they think of something that is very dark and often reflecting death. Gothic Arquitecture was a movement of a style of houses that was often included very large room and was commonly a very dark area. Through these very vague ideas of what something that is Gothic is, someone could read ”The Fall of the House of Usher” written by Poe, and see it as Gothic literature. After viewing the details as to what characterizes a Gothic literature, “The Fall of the House of Usher” is a striking example of a Gothic horror.
The first characteristic of a Gothic horror that we see in just the first couple pages, is the sense that the “House of ...view middle of the document...

A key characteristic to a gothic horror is woman who is constantly in distress. She was often suffering even more because they would often be abandoned and left alone. In Poe’s story Madeline has a terrible disease leaving her to suffer throughout the story. Her disease is also very contagious and is left alone throughout the story. Roderick wasn’t to “be seen by me no more” (742); “I learned that the glimpse I had obtained of her person would thus probably be the last I should obtain” (742). Madeline had become “a gradual wasting away of the person” (742). This reflects a woman that would be in distress.
There are themes and vocabulary that are distinctive to a gothic horror. Most of the vocabulary helps to give a mysterious and eerie feeling to the story. A theme that is given in “The Fall of the House of Usher” is ruins of a building. When looking at the house from the outside Roderick sees “extraordinary dilapidation” (740), “old wood-work which has rotted for long years” (740), and an “indication of extensive decay” (740). This gives the reader and image of an older building see to be falling apart a bit. The vocab that is given, as examples of gothic literature vocab are prevalent all through the story. One of these that is repeated upon several occasions is when speaking of the “vast of a distance” (740) it is across the house and through it.
There is a sense of mystery and eeriness that is present throughout the story. That is keeping the reader very questioning throughout the story. “The Fall of the House of Usher” has many characteristics very similar to that of a Gothic Horror. When compared directly to the Elements of Gothic Literature. It has nearly all these elements and would easily seen by anyone to be an example of a Gothic Horror.

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