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Central Powers In The First World War

1175 words - 5 pages

The First World War, from 1914 to 1918 makes its case in history as one of the bloodiest wars ever. Over 21 million people died as a result. Yet this war was suppose to be a short war, one with minimal causalities that was suppose to end in months, even weeks. But the individuals most involved with the war who first envisioned this "short war" are also the ones that refused to let it come to an end. People from both Central Power, both Germany and Austria-Hungry had great responsibility to the length of this war. Even though pretty much everyone in Europe was involved in the war, it could be argued that this war was conducted by and for a few individual's dream of conquest. In his book The ...view middle of the document...

An inexperienced Karl at the throne succeeded him. Karl spent most of the war making poor political decisions , making poor military decisions , and trying to negotiate a peace at the expense of his ally, Germany . With these foolhardy actions, it is no wonder that Austria-Hungary lost such a large area of real estate and Karl, his crown.The real power however was never with the respective monarchs however. Power in both allies was centralized in within the military.Since the onset of war in Germany, the military, headed by General Moltke, followed by Falkenhayn and eventually the 'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern-esk' Ludendorff and Hindenberg.Moltke, leader of the German army at the dawn of conflict sought to defeat France quickly using the Schlieffen, Moltke's plan however failed when his army was faced with the difficult task of fighting, marching and resupplying over such a large area of land. Moltke took the blame for the failed campaign and was removed from command, which opened the way for Falkenhayn to try his hand at battle.Falkenhayn, who was at odds with both his eventual successors and the Chancellor, figured that the war could be won by taking France out of the picture and therefore pushing the English of the continent and thus winning the war. He believed that "an operation limited to a narrow front" at Verdun would force the French to throw all their forces in the defended it due to its "historic and psychological significance" . It is thought that's if the French were so thoroughly engaged in battle, if would be possible for the French to "bleed to death..." . Falkenhayn's strategy was simply "an offensive 'in the direction of Verdun'" for it was suppose to defeat not the soldiers in the field but rather the politicians back home. The strategy employed at Verdun was not one of great enlightenment, hoping that the Germans would somehow have the last man standing was simply not possible against a superior allied force in both numbers and materials. Falkenhayn's reign came to an end on August 29th 1916.Next in line to give commanding the German army a go is the combination of Ludendorff and Hindenberg. The focus of the...

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