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American History: Did The Articles Of Confederation Really Work?

516 words - 3 pages

From 1781 to 1789, the Articles of Confederation provided the United States with an effective government.The letter from the Rhode Island Assembly to Congress clearly shows us that the Articles of Confederation were effective but not perfect. The Articles did not have the strength to control all the states and make them pay their taxes. This really hurt the aspects of the Articles. It showed that they were weak. The fact is that the Articles may have been weak, but they were the only order of government around at that time. The Articles helped to begin the United States' journey to greatness.The Estimated Market Value of U.S. Exports to ...view middle of the document...

The fact also is that the U.S. traded with other countries that are not depicted on the chart. This shows us that those profits more than likely soared as well. All together, America was pretty well off.The letter from Delegate Joseph Jones of Virginia to George Washington showed the country that debt and cross thinking filled the country, but the Articles really had nothing to do with that. They stipulated trade and other areas of income, but they never forbid anything. The national debt was an everlasting thing that still lives on today. There is no getting rid of it. It will always be there.John Jay's Instructions to the U.S. Minister to Great Britain shows that America was growing and needed their full freedom. The Articles declared full freedom, but they were not given it. This letter in companion with the Articles forced the government to go against Britain to get their freedom. They did in fact get their freedom, and it was well deserved.The map of the Western Lands Ceded by the States in 1781 to 1802 tells us many things about the government. This shows us that the government was effective due to high increase in land and exploration. The government had to be stable in order to allow such changes and order. This clearly shows that the Articles were effective in allowing America to grow and develop into a great power.It is proven through multiple documents that the Articles of Confederation did give the U.S. a very effective government.

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