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12th Night How Is Language Used In Act 2 Scene 4 And Act 3 Scene 1 To Mislead Other Characters?

837 words - 4 pages

Shakespeare's play, Twelfth Night, is all about playing jokes on people, sometimes deliberately confusing them, and just basically having a happy time. Most the characters follow the tradition of Twelfth Night, however some do not. In Act 2 Scene 4, the tradition is not comprehensible, however, in Act 3 Scene 1, it is, as both Feste and Viola/Cesario are making jokes with one another. The selected paragraphs are where people get mislead a lot due to playing on words, double-meanings, or misunderstandings.Act 2 Scene 4 is mostly written in poetry- which means that the scene is not funny, as it would be if it was written in prose, but quite serious and sincere. It starts off quite formal, but ...view middle of the document...

After describing about this daughter's love, she reveals that she is an only child (as she thinks her twin brother, Sebastian, is dead.) " I am all the daughters of my father's house, and all the brothers too," but immediately after this, she realises that she has gone too far and he might figure it out, so she quickly changes the subject with "Sir, shall I to this lady?" so he has to answer the question, and cannot ponder about what Viola/Cesario has just said.Act 3 Scene 1 is written in prose. This is because Feste always speaks in prose, as he is a very humorous, light-hearted character. From this you can tell that he likes to joke around so he might well use puns and try and mislead Viola/Cesario on purpose. It is a very jovial scene. When Viola asks Feste if he lives by the tabor, "Dost thou live by thy tabor?" she meant, "Do you earn your living playing the tabor" but Feste takes her words literally, and replies, "...I do live by the church," meaning he lives next to the church, not lives by the rules of the church. She understands this joke straight away, and to this she answers,...

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