INTERESTING
INTERESTING STUFF:
April 5,2001.
Crash memorial a personal project
    By Jennifer O'Brien
Free Press Reporter
   Fifty years after a Canadian
fighter jet plunged into the bush near a Komoka farm, killing its pilot
and engineer, tobacco grower Mark Matthys and his family are still picking
up the pieces.
   But today, on the anniversary of the crash
that shook the ground of surrounding communities, the farmer has put aside
his digging to remember the occupants of the CF-100 prototype, the first
jet of its kind to crash.
   In the woods beside his tobacco feilds,
the farmer has planted a wooden cross in tribute to Royal Canadian Air
Force pilot Flight Leut. Bruce Warren of Toronto and Avro engineer Robert
Ostrander of Brampton - both killed in the crash on April 5,1951.
   "I just wanted to do something to commemorate
the pilot and to show some respect for him," Matthys said standing beside
several cartons of plane debris he and of his family have discovered with
the help of a metal detector.
   "If he was your grandfather - and he was so willing
to serve the country -. wouldn't you want something done to remember him?"
  Warren, one of Canada's top test pilots when he died at 28,
left behind his wife, Lois, son, Douglas (who now has two daughters) and
a twin
brother, Doug Warren, also an award-winning
pilot.  
    So far, little seems to have been done to remember
the test pilot.
    "It looks like this is the first public memorial
in this case," said Capt. James Pickett, historian at air force headquarters
in Winnipeg. "I don't remember hearing about this particular crash.
     But he said that's not unusual. "There were so
many crashes during that time, because planes were getting faster and
more powerful and there was a lot of testing going on."
  The plane, No. 18102, was the second of 692 CF-100s to be
built. The aircraft could travel at speeds of 890 kilometres an hour and
fly as
high as 45,000 feet. It went down during a test flight for Avro Canada,
which may factor into the lack of memorial, services for Warren, said
Pickett.
"He was testing for Avro, so he didn't belong to a squadron at the time,"
he said, adding that Warren would have been a top choice as a test pilot
because he had attended a  pilots' academy in England.
  Investigators blamed a failure in the oxygen supply for the
accident. The problem would have caused Warren to pass out and lose control
of the plane, which then took a 38,000-foot nosedive.
  "It was, and it still is, very traumatic for me," said Doug
Warren of his twin's death.
MATTHYS
Reproduced with permission from the London
Free Press. Further reproduction without
written permission from the London Free Press is prohibited".©
Ont. Reg. #1428018
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