PLEASE NOTE: I AM MAINTAINING THESE PAGES IN MEMORY OF OUR FRIEND AND FELLOW ARC MEMBER, RANDALL WHITCOMB. WE NO LONGER SELL HIS ARTWORK, BUT ASK THAT RANDY BE REMEMBERED.
Scott McArthur Webmaster.

Commemorating Bomber Command and the Handley Page Halifax Bomber

Bringing it Home
CLICK THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE.
Size approx: 19X25 in.

This dramatic painting of a Handley Page Halifax heavy bomber over a German industrial target has been in the works for nearly 10 years now! It took Whitcomb that long to research, paint and publish this edition along with everything else he has done in the last decade, including research, write, illustrate and publish his first book;Avro Aircraft & Cold War Aviation. The Halifax bomber is a relatively un-sung aircraft even by non-American standards yet it was the mainstay of Bomber Command during the most challenging phases of this aspect of the war. The Halifax entered service earlier than the Avro Lancaster and more Canadians served on Halifaxes by far than on the more popularised Lancaster. The flushriveted Halifax Mk. III, using Bristol Hercules radial engines of around 1,800hp each, made the Halifax more powerful than either the Lancaster or Boeing B-17 and this aircraft was a match for any bomber in the European Theatre.

While many have raised moral issues over the night bombing offensive in particular, at the time it appears to have been the only method Britain had of directly attacking Germany. Considering the fact that the Germans bombed British civilian targets in both WW I and WW II, not to mention Hitler's "starve them into submission" policy, the enforcement of which was then falling to the equally inhumane V-boat offensive, the moral issue changes with viewpoint. Other primary sources reinforce these opinions while, strangely, some historians suggest that the allied Bomber Offensive was a failure. However Heinz Guderian, the famed German tank commander (later in charge of production and deployment of armour for the Reich), stated that the heart of the German industrial machine, the Ruhr Valley, had "ceased to exist as a viable economic area" by the end of 1943 due directly to the results of Bomber Command and the VSAAF's relentless bombing. Luftwaffe General of Fighters, Adolph Galland, has related similar findings in his book The First and the Last.

 
 
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